• The Extraordinaries home page v2
  • The Extraordinaries logo mark (from Left to Right: v1 | v3 | v2)
  • Left: v2 User Landing page | Right: Tweet Notes Media page
  • The Extraordinaries home page v1
  • Left: Mission Profile page v1 | Right: Non Profit Profile page v1
  • iPhone app and various screens
  • Icons, marketing set
  • Icons, mobile set

Extraordinaries

The Extraordinaries began as an iPhone app for people willing to volunteer yet unable to find the time. With tasks that took five minutes or less, one could volunteer for their favorite non-profit while (for example) commuting on a bus.

The app grew into a site that offered tools for micro-volunteering, and eventually enabled nearly 300,000 people to volunteer for non-profits all over the world.

I was brought on to design the website, identity, and mobile app. Visually, aside from a super hero theme, it was a blank slate. After a few weeks with little sleep, version 1 of the site (the blue one) went live, along with a redesigned iphone app.

After several iterations of version 1, I began to design version 2 (the grey one). This version moved the brand to the background to better emphasize user based content, and had one tool rather than a suite. This design, however, didn't go into production. It ended up growing into a new product called Sparked.

  • Role

  • Design
  • Identity
  • Illustration
  • Online

  • 2009

The Crowdsourcing-for-good revolution is on, with new applications rising out of San Francisco's petri dish of open-source activism. Waiting for the bus or the doctor? Bored in a staff meeting? [Use] an app created by The Extraordinaries.

San Francisco Magazine
June, 2009

For folks like The Extraordinaries… there's no IPO at the end of the rainbow, no late-night fantasizing that Google might buy them out. In some ways, their ability to innovate is even more impressive, and more useful, because it's fueled by passion that can't help but inspire in this cynical age. And perhaps that's the best lesson of all for would-be innovators everywhere.

San Jose Mercury News
May 30, 2009